An immediate hit with both fans and critics, this classic family comedy earned an Emmy Award nomination for Outstanding Comedy Series in its very first season and soon found its place among the most popular and acclaimed sitcoms in television history. Tim Allen ratchets up the laughs as Tim "The Toolman" Taylor in HOME IMPROVEMENT'S landmark first season. Relive every hilarious moment with the accident-prone TV show host and the original "Tool Time" girl Pamela Anderson, in this comprehensive 3-disc set, including all 24 episodes and exclusive bonus features. It's the show you love -- with "more power" than ever!
Don’t let your toilet be a mysterious device in the corner of your bathroom: Toilets actually operate by very simple mechanisms that are easy to understand. The majority of toilet issues—clogs, continuous running water, loud noises, etc.—can be solved with the quick purchase of a replacement part and some tinkering in the tank. Don’t be afraid to open it up and take a look. Also note: These are the things you should never, ever flush down a toilet
Long story short(ish), after choosing AFJ in the beginning of October to put in my attic ladder, I finally have it installed, finished and approved as of December 14th . Yep, two and a half months to get an attic ladder put in. It started with the contractor coming out to do the install and telling me that he needed to get a permit after I had already told them that I needed to cut through the joists which is why I didn't want to do it myself. One month of them dragging their feet getting a permit approved with me having to constantly ask for updates. One month of the contractor having to come back 4 more times because the inspection failed... twice! I get the bill for the initial job which took 4 maybe 5 hours. They billed me 11.25 hours. I called to have them specify to which I was told they had to bill for the drawings and only billed me for the cost of the permit. So basically from their explanation, they billed me 6 hours to do some drawings and take them in to get a permit which they even had to redraw because the first draft wasn't good enough. But hey! They wanted to point out that they took $100 off because of the hassle which is why I'm giving them 2 stars instead of one. I would have even given 3 stars but they sent me the bill multiple times before the final work was even approved. Oh not to mention I had to take time off work for the second inspection because the first visit failed.
The Region 1 DVDs are on three discs (with the exception of the final season set, which has four discs), whereas the Region 2 DVDs are presented across four discs, but in Germany the fourth to seventh seasons are also three disc sets. The Region 2 packaging and programme menus for Season 1 vary compared to the Region 1 releases. The Season 3 menus in Region 1 are in widescreen, but 4:3 in Region 2. The Region 1 releases of Seasons 2 and 3 consist of (deliberate) "holes" in the outer packaging—these do not exist in the Region 2 releases; in fact, the Season 3 outer packaging is physically printed where the hole would be in the Region 1 packaging.
Long story short(ish), after choosing AFJ in the beginning of October to put in my attic ladder, I finally have it installed, finished and approved as of December 14th . Yep, two and a half months to get an attic ladder put in. It started with the contractor coming out to do the install and telling me that he needed to get a permit after I had already told them that I needed to cut through the joists which is why I didn't want to do it myself. One month of them dragging their feet getting a permit approved with me having to constantly ask for updates. One month of the contractor having to come back 4 more times because the inspection failed... twice! I get the bill for the initial job which took 4 maybe 5 hours. They billed me 11.25 hours. I called to have them specify to which I was told they had to bill for the drawings and only billed me for the cost of the permit. So basically from their explanation, they billed me 6 hours to do some drawings and take them in to get a permit which they even had to redraw because the first draft wasn't good enough. But hey! They wanted to point out that they took $100 off because of the hassle which is why I'm giving them 2 stars instead of one. I would have even given 3 stars but they sent me the bill multiple times before the final work was even approved. Oh not to mention I had to take time off work for the second inspection because the first visit failed.
Former Denver Broncos quarterback John Elway, then Detroit Pistons star Grant Hill (the season 7 episode "Believe It or Not"), former boxers Evander Holyfield (the season 3 episode "Eve of Construction") and George Foreman (the season 1 episode "Unchained Malady"), and former President Jimmy Carter all appeared on the series. Carter made an appearance during season three episode "Eve of Construction", which focused on Habitat for Humanity.
Another related issue for avoiding costly repairs (or disasters) is the proper operation of a home, including systems and appliances, in a way that prevents damage or prolongs their usefulness. For example, at higher latitudes, even a clean rain gutter can suddenly build up an ice dam in winter, forcing melt water into unprotected roofing, resulting in leaks or even flooding inside walls or rooms. This can be prevented by installing moisture barrier beneath the roofing tiles. A wary home-owner should be alert to the conditions that can result in larger problems and take remedial action before damage or injury occurs. It may be easier to tack down a bit of worn carpet than repair a large patch damaged by prolonged misuse. Another example is to seek out the source of unusual noises or smells when mechanical, electrical or plumbing systems are operating—sometimes they indicate incipient problems. One should avoid overloading or otherwise misusing systems, and a recurring overload may indicate time for an upgrade.
In accepting and rejecting applications, Asheville Area Habitat for Humanity must conform to all aspects of the Fair Housing Act and all Fair Housing Laws, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, the Privacy Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, as well as any local applicable laws as they apply to applications for a mortgage.
Another consideration to think about is how many people it will take to do the job. A single person can build a house. However, it’s going to take a very long time and will be very difficult. Installing insulation or drywall can be handled quite easily by one person and requires little in the way of specialized skills. The actual effort of the job should be regarded as well. Installing a cinderblock wall is very labor-intensive. Moving blocks, mortar, and rebar can become tiring very quickly.  
Before the first pilot was shot, actor John Bedford Lloyd was in the running for one of two roles; that of Tim's Tool Time assistant (originally named "Glen") and the role of Wilson. Bedford Lloyd eventually got the part of Wilson, but his agent later made claims that the actor was unaware that most of his scenes would require his face to be partially hidden behind a fence. For this reason, the crew received news just one day prior to taping the first pilot that Bedford-Lloyd had dropped out. Casting immediately contacted the other actor considered for the role, Earl Hindman.
Plumbing vent boots can be all plastic, plastic and metal, or even two-piece metal units. Check plastic bases for cracks and metal bases for broken seams. Then examine the rubber boot surrounding the pipe. That can be rotted away or torn, allowing water to work its way into the house along the pipe. With any of these problems, you should buy a new vent boot to replace the old one. But if the nails at the base are missing or pulled free and the boot is in good shape, replace them with the rubber-washered screws used for metal roofing systems. You’ll find them at any home center with the rest of the screws. You’ll have to work neighboring shingles free on both sides. If you don’t have extra shingles, be careful when you remove shingles so they can be reused. Use a flat bar to separate the sealant between the layers. Then you’ll be able to drive the flat bar under the nail heads to pop out the nails.
If you’re looking for a Denver handyman who can fix a leaking faucet, replace a faulty light switch, put in a new toilet or shower, patch or replace drywall, install or build some shelving, put in a ceiling fan, paint a room, repair a fence, build a closet, or perform pretty much any other maintenance or repair project . . . Grandma’s Handyman Service in Denver can help!
During its eight-season run, the show always finished in the top 10 in the Nielsen ratings during a season, despite never making the #1 slot (its highest finish was a second-place spot in the show's third season). The series finale became the fifth highest-rated series finale television program of the 1990s and the ninth overall series finale ever presented on a single network in television history, watched by 35.5 percent of the households sampled in America, and 21.6 percent of television viewers.
Many small repairs or modifications can easily be handled by anyone with a screwdriver or hammer.  DIY, however, is entirely dependent on the individual. What one person considers a simple task could be well beyond the abilities of another person. One way to decide if a project is better as a DIY project is to ask yourself what can go wrong and how badly.
The average single-family homeowner spends around $2,000 a year on maintenance, according to Bankrate.com. That is considerably less than the monthly fees for most condos or co-ops. But even though the monthly outlay for those homeowners might be lower than that of condo or co-op owners, house owners generally are not squirreling away those savings for a rainy day. Nearly half of them have less than $1,000 saved, and a third have nothing saved, according to Liberty Mutual Insurance. So when that sump pump suddenly fails, odds are, we’re scrambling to pay the plumber for a new one.
Home Improvement is an American television sitcom starring Tim Allen that aired on ABC from September 17, 1991 to May 25, 1999, with a total of 204 half-hour episodes spanning over eight seasons. The series was created by Matt Williams, Carmen Finestra, and David McFadzean. In the 1990s, it was one of the most watched sitcoms in the United States, winning many awards. The series launched Tim Allen's acting career and was the start of the television career of Pamela Anderson, who was part of the recurring cast for the first two seasons.[1]
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