In the first two years of the show, Pamela Anderson played the part of Tim's Tool Girl, Lisa, on Tool Time, but left the show to focus on her role on the syndicated series Baywatch. Her last episode as a series regular was "The Great Race", which aired on May 19, 1993. Tim's new assistant, Heidi, played by Debbe Dunning, replaced Anderson as the Tool Time Girl for the following third season, starting with "Maybe Baby", which aired on September 15, 1993. Anderson did reprise the role of Lisa on the sixth-season finale episode "The Kiss and the Kiss-Off", which aired on May 20, 1997.
I have spent many a year watching reruns of this show, catching bits and pieces of it at times. Now I can play the dvd when I want to and pause if I need to. I love this show. I love the idea behind the story, I love all of the characters, the idea of a family consisting of a father who represents true machismo by wanting more more power is just hilarious, and the fact he is so dang funny adds great character to the show. I appreciate also the fact that certain basic storyline facts are based on Tim Allen's life, and I like how that tied in to the show. It is a funny and heartfelt show that I will always love watching with my family.
Tim Allen, Richard Karn, Casey Sander, and Debbe Dunning had a reunion in a television special named Tim Allen Presents: A User's Guide to Home Improvement in 2003 (a by then terminally-ill Earl Hindman did voice-overs, befitting his never-seen persona of Wilson; Hindman died shortly after the special aired).[60] Allen presented his own favorite clips from the show, insider's tips, personal reflections and a question and answer session with the live audience. The special is included on the season 8 DVD set.
I acknowledge that each independent Mr. Handyman® franchisee hires and determines the terms and conditions of employment for its own employees. Any employment benefits, compensation and employment practices vary by location. Neither Mr. Handyman International LLC (“Franchisor”) nor its affiliates have the power to: (1) hire, fire or modify the employment condition of franchisee’s employees; (2) supervise and control franchisee’s employee work schedule or conditions of employment; (3) determine the rate and method of payment; or (4) accept, review or maintain franchisee employment records. Mr. Handyman International LLC is NOT the employer and/or joint employer for: (i) any of the job opportunities listed on this website; (ii) any of the independent franchisees; and, (iii) any of the employees of the independent franchisees.
There's no national standard or regulation for handymen. Licensing and regulation vary by state. New Jersey, for example, requires handymen who work for a profit to register with the state and carry insurance. California requires handymen to carry a license from the State Contractors License Board to work on any project that exceeds $500 in labor and material costs. Find out before you hire the handyman if he or she has the skills needed to complete your project.
Check for cracked housings on plastic roof vents and broken seams on metal ones. You might be tempted to throw caulk at the problem, but that solution won’t last long. There’s really no fix other than replacing the damaged vents. Also look for pulled or missing nails at the base’s bottom edge. Replace them with rubber-washered screws. In most cases, you can remove nails under the shingles on both sides of the vent to pull it free. There will be nails across the top of the vent too. Usually you can also work those loose without removing shingles. Screw the bottom in place with rubber-washered screws. Squeeze out a bead of caulk beneath the shingles on both sides of the vent to hold the shingles down and to add a water barrier. That’s much easier than renailing the shingles.
Professionals offering handyman services through Handy come with a wealth of skill and experience. This means that you can book a versatile handyman who can take care of a variety of jobs at the time that's best for you. Rather than spending your Saturday morning trying to find studs in your walls or questioning whether you can trust the guy at the hardware store to give you good advice, why not use the Handy platform to hire a handyman who can deal with everything? Whether you need urgent help for home repairs, or just a few odd jobs taken care of, using Handy to book a general contractor or handyman can help you save both time and money.
I acknowledge that each independent Mr. Handyman® franchisee hires and determines the terms and conditions of employment for its own employees. Any employment benefits, compensation and employment practices vary by location. Neither Mr. Handyman International LLC (“Franchisor”) nor its affiliates have the power to: (1) hire, fire or modify the employment condition of franchisee’s employees; (2) supervise and control franchisee’s employee work schedule or conditions of employment; (3) determine the rate and method of payment; or (4) accept, review or maintain franchisee employment records. Mr. Handyman International LLC is NOT the employer and/or joint employer for: (i) any of the job opportunities listed on this website; (ii) any of the independent franchisees; and, (iii) any of the employees of the independent franchisees.
If you can’t see any telltale flow marks, and since the stain is fairly small, look at the underside of the roof for ‘shiners.’ A shiner is a nail that missed the framing member, in this case when the carpenter nailed the roof sheathing to the rafters. Moisture that escapes into the cold attic from the rooms below often condenses on cold nails. Sometimes you can spot this if you climb up into your attic on a cold night. The nails will look white because they’re frosted. When the attic heats up a bit during the day, the frost melts and drips, then the nails frost up at night again and so on. The solution is to simply clip the nail with a side-cutting pliers.
Need your garage door repaired? Odds are, once you account for materials, labor and unforeseen hiccups, you’ll be writing a check for a grand. Your sump pump died? A new one could cost you around $600 for parts and labor, which doesn’t seem so bad considering the alternative is a flooded basement. But then the plumber might discover that the pipe carrying the water from the house to the street is clogged with years’ of debris and needs to be flushed out. And maybe there’s a blockage somewhere. There you have it: $1,000.
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